Email updates

Keep up to date with the latest news and content from Radiation Oncology and BioMed Central.

Open Access Research

Treatment outcome and toxicity of intensity-modulated (chemo) radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer patients

Stephanie LA Govaert1, Esther GC Troost1, Olga CJ Schuurbiers2, Lioe-Fee de Geus-Oei3, Ariën Termeer4, Paul N Span1 and Johan Bussink1*

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands

2 Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands

3 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, PO Box 9101, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands

4 Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital, Nijmegen The Netherlands

For all author emails, please log on.

Radiation Oncology 2012, 7:150  doi:10.1186/1748-717X-7-150

Published: 7 September 2012

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess treatment outcome, and acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using intensity modulated (sequential/concurrent chemo)radiotherapy (IMRT) in locally advanced stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods and materials

Eighty-six patients with advanced stage NSCLC, treated with either IMRT only (66 Gy) or combined with (sequential or concurrent) chemotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. Overall survival and metastasis-free survival were assessed as well as acute pulmonary and esophageal toxicity using the RTOG Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria.

Results

Irrespective of the treatment modality, the overall survival rate for patients receiving 66 Gy was 71% (±11%; 95% CI) after one year and 56% (±14%) after two years resulting in a median overall survival of 29.7 months. Metastasis-free survival was 73% (±11%) after both one and two years. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups. Treatment related esophageal toxicity was significantly more pronounced in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy group (p = 0.013) with no differences in pulmonary toxicity.

Conclusions

This retrospective cohort study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients shows that IMRT is an effective technique with acceptable acute toxicity, also when (sequentially or concomitantly) combined with chemotherapy.

Keywords:
Intensity-modulated (chemo)radiotherapy; Stage III non-small cell lung cancer